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Adoption is an Option: Help Children and Youth Create Lifelong Connections

Adoption is an Option: Help Children and Youth Create Lifelong Connections

November is Adoption Awareness Month

In recognition of Adoption Awareness Month this November, the Ontario Association of Children’s Aid Societies (OACAS) and Children’s Aid Societies (CASs) across Ontario are raising awareness that all children and youth need and deserve a family to love and nurture them always. Mary Ballantyne, executive director, OACAS said, “Every child and youth needs a forever family that provides support, unconditional love and a safe, loving home.” When parents or caregivers are unable to provide a safe living environment for their children, Children’s Aid makes every effort to provide them with support so they may remain safely in their family home. If the safety of a child or youth cannot be ensured and they come into the permanent care of Children’s Aid, a plan for their extended future is begun immediately. This plan relies on finding a lifelong, permanent connection for the child or youth – a family.

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Oakville firefighters launch annual toy drive

Oakville firefighters launch annual toy drive

The Oakville Professional Firefighters Association (OPFFA) will launch its 22nd annual toy drive Saturday, Nov. 15 at the annual Oakville Santa Claus Parade.

“We are proud to continue this holiday tradition and call on all of Oakville to help local families and children in need,” said Phil Cartwright, vice-president of the OPFFA.

“Oakville firefighters are committed to supporting our community, and we know that Oakville residents and businesses will come together to bring holiday gifts to every child in our town.”

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Seven thousand children in CAS care waiting to be adopted

Halton couples who adopted children share their stories

Two Halton brothers were separated before they were old enough to walk. Another teenager lived in more than 20 different houses before he finally found a home. These three boys had faced deprivation, neglect and emotional trauma in their lives. Now, they eat healthy dinners, go on vacations and, most importantly, they rest their heads on their own pillow every night. “They now have a family connection. They’re finally home,” said Lynne Rheault, adoption supervisor with the Halton Children’s Aid Society (CAS).

This year marks the 100th anniversary of the Children’s Aid Society of Halton. November is also Adoption Awareness Month. To celebrate, adoptive parents have come forward to share their special stories. One story centres around two boys who were separated for their own welfare before the age of two and placed into foster care for neglected children. The abandonment they had faced required them to receive individual attention. This meant separate homes.

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